This action strategy will explore the creation of a Transit Revitalization Investment District (TRID) to catalyze equitable transit-oriented development (eTOD) near the Allegheny Station. This is a continuation of the Manchester-Chateau Neighborhood Plan and is not a new vision plan for the Manchester-Chateau neighborhoods.

Continuation of Plan

What is TRID?

A TRID is a tool that uses value capture to implement equitable Transit Oriented Development [eTOD] projects and public infrastructure improvements in your neighborhood. Value capture is simply ensuring that any new tax revenue gained by new development in the neighborhood, like the envisioned Esplanade, is reinvested back into Manchester-Chateau.

TRID Study Area

TRID Study Area  Eligible locations within an area generally formed by a radius not to exceed three-quarters of a mile from a transit stop measured from the centerline of the track.   The specific boundaries of a TRID may be expanded or reduced based on l

Eligible locations within an area generally formed by a radius not to exceed three-quarters of a mile from a transit stop measured from the centerline of the track.

The specific boundaries of a TRID may be expanded or reduced based on local circumstances such as local economic development and planning goals, community character, property boundary and scale variations.

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FAQ

The 2019 community-led Manchester-Chateau Neighborhood Plan created a vision for Manchester that healed the divide created by highway SR 65 in the 1960s. It called for reuniting Manchester with Chateau, improving access to the Allegheny Station, and reconnecting the neighborhood to the riverfront.

The purpose of this action strategy is to explore the creation of a Transit Revitalization Investment District (TRID) to fund some of the recommendations that came out of the Manchester Chateau Neighborhood Plan.

A TRID is a tool that uses value capture to implement equitable Transit Oriented Development [eTOD] projects and public infrastructure improvements in your neighborhood. Value capture is simply ensuring that any new tax revenue gained by new development in the neighborhood, like the envisioned Esplanade, is reinvested back into Manchester-Chateau.

Specifically, this study will look at:

  • Leveraging new North Shore development to benefit the Manchester-Chateau neighborhoods
  • Prioritizing public infrastructure improvements to facilitate car-free/light living in the study area
  • Evaluating the potential reuse of publicly owned vacant land
  • Bridging the psychological and physical barriers that exist between the Manchester-Chateau neighborhoods and the Allegheny Station

This strategy is not a new vision plan for the Manchester-Chateau neighborhoods! This strategy is a continuation of that planning process, it’s the next step in order to fund the plan already created by the residents of Manchester.

Transit Revitalization Investment Districts are nearly identical to Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Districts except for one key element: the notion of transit oriented development. Where a TIF district is centered around a distressed neighborhood, TRIDs are centered around transit stations.

A selection committee composed of the Manchester Citizens Corporation, Millcraft, Port Authority of Allegheny County, Urban Redevelopment Authority, and the City of Pittsburgh selected Interface Studio to develop the Manchester-Chateau TRID Action Strategy. Interface Studio has partnered with Real Estate Strategies and Omnes Studio to complete this work.

It is essential that the community contribute to this process, not only to help inform if a TRID should be created in the neighborhood, but how the money generated from a TRID should be prioritized for different neighborhood improvements.

This action strategy will share the findings of whether or not a TRID is feasible in this neighborhood, and if so, what it will be able to fund and considerations on how to prioritize potential projects.

We believe community input is valuable ‘data’ and should be treated as such. Input received will remain anonymous, but for transparency sake will be made available publicly and summarized in an Appendix to the study.