This is the archive of the meetings of the Community Action Team.

The archive is organized into three sections:

  1. Process Introduction & Equity (10/2020 - 1/2021)
  2. Issues & Opportunities (1/2021 - 6/2021)
  3. Research (to begin in summer 2021)

Step 1: Process Introduction & Equity (10/2020 - 1/2021)

The first meeting of the Community Action Team covered the following topics:

  • Welcome & land acknowledgement
  • What will Action Teams do in the Oakland Plan?
    • Planning process based on the City's Neighborhood Plan Guide
    • How equity is being integrated in to the process
    • Role of the Action Teams
    • Information about the proposals we'll develop together
    • Topics we'll cover in our Action Team
    • Expectations for participation
  • What will the Community Action Team cover?
  • Get to know the room -- introductions & polling
  • Discussion (notes recorded directly into the presentation on slide 32)
    • What comes to mind when thinking of community and Oakland?
    • Based on topics below (or those unlisted), what's most important to you for the Oakland community?
    • How have you interacted with your home and neighborhood since being quarantined?

In the second meeting of the Community Action Team, we reviewed outcomes from the first round of public engagement on EngagePGH and discussed major themes that arose from the public input. We overviewed the intended program for the next few months, and then hosted two rounds of discussion, one in small groups and one as a large group.

The first break out group used a SWOT (Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities, Issues/Threats) model to discuss topics of interest to the group and areas for further focus. Notes from these break out groups are recorded in the Presentation for Community Action Team Meeting 2 on slides 21-23.

Upon returning to the large group, participants were asked to share what their groups found were the most pressing issues and opportunities, and how we can "get there".

Finally, we presented next steps for the Community Action Team and introduced some reading for the group to prepare for the December meeting, which would focus on equity.

During the third meeting, we hosted an Equity Workshop. The same format will be used in the three other Oakland Plan Action Teams in January 2021. We began the meeting with a land acknowledgement, and reviewing expectations for participation. We also shared major themes staff identified from previous Community Action Team discussions.

Diving into the Equity Workshop, the agenda covered:

  • Why are we here?
  • Review of Oakland Plan equity commitment
  • Ground in history
  • Workshop equity commitments + outputs
  • Next steps

In addition to discussion of previously shared documents and videos, the group watched a short video from NowThis titled "How Housing Redlining Caused Wealth Gap & Segregation". Discussion of these materials can be found on slide 13 in the Presentation for Community Action Team Meeting 3. Reviewed materials are linked below:

  • How Urban Renewal Crushed PGH:

Finally, the group workshopped equity goals using the following prompts:

  1. What comes to mind when thinking of "equity"?
  2. What are some examples of inequities/commonly encountered barriers that show up in this space (ex. inaccessible design, cost of transit and availability of options)?
  3. If you were to counteract those inequities, how would you articulate concrete goals within this space (ex. universal design)?
  4. How could this neighborhood planning process reduce/eliminate these barriers (ex. cost protections, increased access, additional modes of transportation, etc.)?

Notes from this conversation can be found on slides 20-22.

The meeting closed with equity next steps, and general Oakland Plan next steps.

In the fourth meeting of the Community Action Team, we reviewed a new online resource and continued the Equity Workshop from December. Action Team members were instructed to visit this site: https://engage.pittsburghpa.gov/oakland/community-action-team. The page is publicly accessible and serves as a space for the Oakland Plan Community Action Team to view and record its work. It will be updated periodically and will remain live in between meetings. All engagements on this page will require users to register with the site (if anyone has difficulty using the site or accessing their account, they can reach out to sophia.robison@pittsburghpa.gov).

Moving into the Equity Workshop Part 2, staff presented draft equity goals for each of the Community Action Team’s nine topic areas (written following review of comments from the Online Open House and the December Action Team meeting). Participants were separated into two breakout groups, each taking four to five of the nine statements, and spending about 45 minutes reviewing them. Prompts for these breakout groups are recorded in the Presentation for Community Action Team Meeting 4 on slides 9 and 10. Action Team members can continue to provide comments on these Equity Goals on the EngagePGH Community Action Team page (scroll down from this summary). Staff will use these comments to craft final Equity Goals and will share those here.

Upon returning to the large group, there were short report outs. Staff then introduced the plan for February’s meeting and assigned some homework. Action Team members are asked to use the Community Action Team site and navigate to “Current & Upcoming Meetings” then click on “Meeting 5 (2.1.21)”. Here, they will find information about February’s speakers, a short overview of livability and identity background for Oakland, and a Q&A tool where they can leave any questions for February’s speakers.

Step 2: Issues & Opportunities (1/2021 - 6/2021)

Meeting 4 (1.11.21)

January's meeting will continue conversation about equity commitments from December's meeting. Below is an overview of the December meeting and notes taken. Click here for the link to January's presentation.

During the December Community Action Team Meeting, the group began workshopping Equity Commitments and Outputs. The following materials were shared with the group before the meeting for review and discussion:

  1. YouTube Video: How Urban Renewal Crushed PGH
  2. Where is this conversation now? Let’s look at the Hill District:
  3. Chateau, A Fragmented History and a colorful future: https://www.thenorthsidechronicle.com/chateau-a-fr...
  4. Health effects of past housing discrimination (NPR): https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2020/11/...


The following slides are an excerpt of the Equity Workshop presentation providing background about equity issues in Pittsburgh.

Meeting 4 (1.11.2021) -- Equity Workshop Part 2

DISCUSSION 1. What did you think about the readings and video?

What did you already know? What did you learn? How do you think these stories are applicable to Oakland?
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Committing to Equity

Following discussion of materials, the group began workshopping equity goals. Below is the slides from the presentation that highlight questions to consider when workshopping equity goals, steering committee feedback, and definition of output.

DISCUSSION 2. Workshopping Equity Goals

  1. What comes to mind when thinking of “equity”?
  2. What are some examples of inequities/commonly encountered barriers that show up in this space?
    • Ex. inaccessible design, cost of transit and availability of options
  3. If you were to counteract those inequities, how would you articulate concrete goals within this space?
    • Ex. universal design
  4. How could this neighborhood planning process reduce/eliminate these barriers?
    • Ex. cost protections, increased access, additional modes of transportation, etc.
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Meeting 5 (2.1.21)

Meeting 5 (2.1.2021) -- How do we plan for livability?

The February meeting will invite in speakers to discuss what livability and identity are, how cities strive to achieve them, how livability and equity are tied together, and how communities and institutions can collaborate to realize shared livability goals.


Andrea Boykowycz, Long-Time Oakland Resident

Andrea will give a quick presentation about her personal experience of livability in Oakland while she has lived and worked here. She currently serves at the Community Services Director for the Oakland Planning & Development Corporation.


Spencer Williams, AICP, Assoc. AIA -- Director of Advocacy

Bio: Spencer joined MAS in June 2019. Prior to MAS, he was Director of Housing Policy at the Association for Neighborhood and Housing Development. He previously served in various roles in the Portland, Oregon and Seattle, Washington, working on issues around growth management, comprehensive planning, affordable housing, design review, land use and zoning, and small area neighborhood planning projects across the region. He is a certified planner who holds a Master of Urban & Regional Planning degree from Portland State University and B.F.A. in Architecture from Savannah College of Art and Design. He currently resides in Brooklyn.

About MAS NYC: MAS envisions a future in which all New Yorkers share in the richness of city life—where growth is balanced, character endures, and a resilient future is secured. Over more than 125 years of history, our advocacy efforts have led to the creation of the New York City Planning Commission, Public Design Commission, Landmarks Preservation Commission, and the Tribute in Light; the preservation of Grand Central Terminal, the lights of Times Square, and the Garment District; the conservation of more than 50 works of public art; and the founding of such civic organizations as the Public Art Fund, the New York Landmarks Conservancy, P.S. 1, the Historic Districts Council, the Park Avenue Armory Conservancy, and the Waterfront Alliance. Through its advocacy, MAS protects New York’s legacy spaces, encourages thoughtful planning and urban design, and fosters complete neighborhoods across the five boroughs.


Sarah Nesbella, Development Coordinator

Bio: Sarah Nesbella is the Development Coordinator of Community Human Services. She's also Head Chair of the CHS Advocacy Committee and works each day to promote the belief CHS has operated under since the 1970s: that everyone has value.

About Community Human Services:


Preparation for the February 2021 Meeting

Please review the information about livability and identity in Oakland in the accordion below. If you have any questions for the staff team or Mr. Williams prior to the meeting, please add them in the Q&A.

"A livable community is one that is safe and secure, has affordable and appropriate housing and transportation options, and has supportive community features and services. Once in place, those resources enhance personal independence; allow residents to age in place; and foster residents’ engagement in the community’s civic, economic, and social life." – The Policy Book: AARP Public Policies (link)

Livability means something different to most people. When lots of different styles of livability are accommodated, a neighborhood often feels inviting and interesting. However, what is livable for some can be in conflict with what is livable for others, especially if development doesn't balance the needs of various communities. This is especially important in Oakland, a community of nearly 20,000 people spread across four city-designated areas: West Oakland, North Oakland, Central Oakland and South Oakland. The neighborhood these four areas form possesses an unparalleled combination of academic, medical, and cultural institutions surrounded by a vibrant residential community. A 2017 Brookings Institute report highlighted the potential for Oakland to become a global innovation hub, while also recognizing the many issues to be addressed before that potential can be realized and before it would lead to widespread workforce and community benefits for Pittsburgh.

Oakland has always been home to multiple residential communities providing housing for a diverse group of Pittsburghers. Recent discussion in Oakland have revealed an alignment between the universities, healthcare providers, and the residential community around increasing the district's supply of affordable housing for long-term residents including faculty and staff, as well as students.

Of this population, Oakland is extremely diverse and has a composition different than that of the greater city. More of Oakland's population identifies as Asian and/or white and less of Oakland's population identifies as Black than the city overall. Each area of Oakland is different in terms of racial composition. While Central Oakland is the most homogenous with over 80% of the resident population identifying as white, West Oakland is the most diverse racially with almost half of residents identifying as non-white (according to self-reported Census data on racial identity). The population of residents who identify as Black has been declining across all Oakland neighborhoods, particularly in West Oakland. There is concern that these demographic changes reflect a lack of livability, inclusivity, and affordability for Black Oaklanders.

Another distinction of Oakland is that it hosts a higher share of very low-income households than the city overall. Over 40% of Oakland's households have incomes of less than $15,000 per year, with South Oakland as the most diversified in terms of income among Oakland's areas. West Oakland has the highest concentration of low-income households, but also has a greater relative share of middle income households earning $35,000-$49,000. And North Oakland has the highest percentage of higher income households. There are comparatively few of the highest income households in South and Central Oakland.

For many, livability is directly related to affordability and access to amenities and services. Rent in Oakland is difficult to decipher because of the large student renter population, however, there are stark differences among race on home-ownership in Oakland. While fewer than a quarter of the occupied housing units in Oakland are owner-occupied, 73% of the owner-occupied housing units are owned by white households. 15% of the occupied housing units are occupied by Asian households and 84% of these households rent. 14% of the occupied housing units are occupied by black households and 78% of these households rent. The differences in representation of home-ownership among races is a clear indicator of differing livability based on background and experience. Similar trends emerge among other indicators of livability, but home-ownership is one of the most stark.

Two major points of discussion that emerge when thinking about livability and identity in Oakland are:

  1. Oakland's student population comes from over 100 countries throughout the world. How can Oakland provide opportunities for them to stay and feel welcome?
  2. What can be done to retain and grow Oakland's Black population?

Topics: Community Programs and Livability, Cultural Heritage and Preservation, Public Art, Public Safety, Public Facilities and Services, Public Health

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Sophia Robison

Department of City Planning

Alyssa Lyon

Green Building Alliance

Josiah Gilliam

Mayor's Office / CitiParks

Spencer Williams, AICP, Assoc. AIA

Director of Advocacy, Municipal Art Society of New York

Identity (speaker not confirmed)

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Livability

Issues

What's happening today? Projects, places, organizations, efforts. What’s not working or could be going better?
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Opportunities

What are the opportunities for the future of Oakland related to this topic? Think about what you've seen elsewhere or dreamed could happen. This can be both specific ideas or bigger visionary ideas.
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Identity & Community Programs

Issues

What's happening today? Projects, places, organizations, efforts. What’s not working or could be going better?
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Opportunities

What are the opportunities for the future of Oakland related to this topic? Think about what you've seen elsewhere or dreamed could happen. This can be both specific ideas or bigger visionary ideas.
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Meeting 6 (3.1.21)

Meeting 6 (3.1.21)

The March meeting will invite in speakers to discuss how public art and historic preservation play a role in the Oakland experience. A variety of perspectives will be shared through presentation followed by discussion about issues and opportunities for each topic.

Preparation for the March 2021 Meeting

Please review the information in the accordion below. If you have any questions for the staff team or the speakers prior to the meeting, please add them in the Q&A for their respective topic.

Oakland is more than just the education and healthcare center we know and love. It is also a dense and rich hub of arts and culture with roots back to some of the first installations of public art in the City. These roots offer a unique opportunity to preserve and cherish the past while honoring and engaging the dynamic and constant confluence that the community is known for.

History

Oakland is home to significant history in arts and culture.

In 1893, the Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens was founded with the purpose of education and entertainment.

Envisioning the neighborhood as an epicenter for arts and culture, titan of industry Andrew Carnegie founded the Carnegie Museum of Art and the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh in 1895 and the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in 1896.

The historic 1908 installation of the Mary Schenley fountain as freely available public art coincides with the first convening of the Pittsburgh Arts Commission. When the soon-to-be-named University of Pittsburgh moved to Oakland that same year, they took some inspiration from the four cast bronze Panther statues by Giuseppi Moretti installed at the corners of Schenley Park in 1898.

In 1910, the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall was completed to honor every branch of the military and to honor those who fought in the Civil War. In 1915, the original Oakland Theatre opened on the site of the former Oakland Natatorium that had been finished in 1890.

Current Context

Oakland continues to be a richly dense community for arts and culture. It maintains many of the aforementioned assets as institutions with international influence and prominence. It is home to monuments, memorials, and murals that honor the past and uplift the stories of the present.


This positions the community to consider and inform the future of arts and culture. As the place where many thousands of students and professionals come every year, it has the chance to incorporate and impact these influences through integrating them into its ongoing sense of community.

As such, it is only fitting that arts and culture weigh heavily and appropriately in the neighborhood planning process. Whether considering how its institutions embrace and mark the coming decades or how the community can influence its next era of public art, Oakland stands once again as an epicenter of what is possible.

Public Art

RESCHEDULED: Nola Mims -- Student of Studio Art at the University of Pittsburgh

Presentation (part of Anthony Cavalline's presentation, see slides 2-5)


Anthony Cavalline -- Arts, Culture and Historic Specialist at the City of Pittsburgh Department of City Planning, Division of Public Art & Civic Design

Presentation

Bio: Tony Cavalline is the Arts, Culture, and History Specialist for the Department of City Planning and is a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh. He is also a mixed media artist exploring ideas of memory, identity, and perception. He lives in Lawrenceville.

About PA+CD: The Public Art & Civic Design Division of the Dept of City Planning promotes and ensures high-quality public art and civic design in order to sustain and enhance meaningful, memorable and enjoyable experiences. Develops and supports the inclusion of art and programming that reflect the city's history, diversity, and culture. Key tasks include staffing the City's Art Commission, conserving and maintaining the City's collection of public artwork, monuments, and memorials, and planning and implementing new commissions of public art and programs.


Dr. Amy J. Bowman-McElhone -- Director of the Carlow University Art Gallery & Assistant Professor in Art History

Bio: Dr. Bowman-McElhone currently serves as the Art Program Director, University Art Gallery Director, and is an Assistant Professor in Art History at Carlow University in Pittsburgh, PA where she curates transdisciplinary, justice-oriented exhibitions and aims to cultivate the gallery as a space for experimentation and dialogue. Previously she served as the Assistant Vice President of the University of West Florida Historic Trust Museums, and the Director and Chief Curator of the UWF Pensacola Museum of Art where she curated a number of exhibitions including Stone’s Throw: On Borders, Boundaries and the Beyond featuring the work of contemporary artists Candice Breitz and Carlos Rolon.

Current curatorial projects Bowman-McElhone is working on include the group shows the Anthropology of Motherhood: The Culture of Care (2020) and I Forgot to Laugh: Humor and Contemporary Art. She also co-founded in 2020 the inaugural Teaching Artist Residency at Carlow University in collaboration with the K-8 Campus Laboratory School. Bowman-McElhone recently received a CIC Humanities Research for the Public Good grant to support the archival and curatorial project “The Power of Voice and the Agency of Citizenship: The International Poetry Forum Collection and Social Change” and is currently on the grant team for a co-institutional Andrew K. Mellon Foundation grant with the University of Pittsburgh and Carlow University focused on the intersections of the Arts, Humanities and community engagement.

Her publications include the 2020 book chapter “Memory-Place and the Unintentional Monument: Pittsburgh’s Civic Arena (1961-2012) and Its Legacy” in the Routledge edited volume Contested Commemoration in U.S. History. Her research has also been published in the peer-reviewed journals Arts and the Journal of Curatorial Studies. Bowman-McElhone has recently co-chaired the CAA 2020 panel “Role Call: Gender Roles, Performative Imaginaries, and Decolonial Feminist Critiques,” and will be presenting the paper “The Sunday Curator: Mike Kelley’s “Uncanny” Exhibition (1993) And the Political Agency of Art” for SECAC 2020. Her upcoming publications includes a co-authored book chapter “’The Battle is Joined’: Contemporary Art and Contested Memorial Ecologies” in the edited volume Heritage Wars and the Road to Reconciliation: Approaching the Problem with Confederate Memory from Many Directions to be published by the University of Florida Press in 2020.

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Sophia Robison

Department of City Planning

Brianna Mims

Student of Studio Art at the University of Pittsburgh

Anthony Cavalline

Arts, Culture & History Specialist at the City of Pittsburgh

Dr. Amy Bowman-McElhone

Director of the Carlow University Art Gallery & Assistant Professor

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Issues

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Opportunities

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Historic Preservation

Kathleen Gallagher -- Long-Time Oakland Resident

Presentation


Matthew Falcone -- President of Preservation Pittsburgh

Presentation

Bio: Matthew Falcone has been a board member of Preservation Pittsburgh for six years and President of the Board for five. He holds degrees in Integrative Arts and History of Art from Penn State University and the University of York (UK) respectively. Matthew's historic preservation passion is primarily in stained glass and Victorian Era architecture. With two little ones, he doesn’t have much spare time but enjoys conserving stained glass, traveling, and serves on several non-profit boards in Pittsburgh. Matthew lives with his family in historic Deutschtown.

About Preservation Pittsburgh: Preservation Pittsburgh is a non-profit advocacy group dedicated to preserving our region's historic, architectural, cultural, and environmental heritage. We seek to assist individuals and organizations in preserving the integrity of the architecture and physical surroundings they value and to further preservation public policy. Visit their website: http://www.preservationpgh.org/.

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Sophia Robison

Department of City Planning

Kathleen Gallagher

Long-Time Oakland Resident

Matthew Falcone

President, Preservation Pittsburgh

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Issues

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Opportunities

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Meeting 7 (4.5.21)

Meeting 7 -- Public Health & Public Safety

During the April meeting, we will discuss Public Safety and Public Health. We are pleased to have Laura Drogowski (Manager, Office of Community Health & Safety at the City of Pittsburgh), and Sergeant Tiffany Kline-Costa (Community Relations Officer, Pittsburgh Police) joining us. They will give two presentations during the meeting, one focused on current safety and health issues, and the other focused on ideas for change in Oakland’s public health and public safety experience. These are heavy topics and can result in triggering conversations. We ask that everyone be respectful of each other’s viewpoints, come with an open mind, and let us know ahead of time if you would be supported in participation by any accommodations.

Tonight's Speakers

The April meeting will invite speakers from the City of Pittsburgh staff to discuss what public safety and public health are, how the City is and can strive to achieve them, and how they are linked with equity outcomes.

Laura Drogowski

Manager of the Office of Community Health & Safety

Bio: Laura Drogowski is the Critical Communities Manager for the Bureau of Neighborhood Empowerment. She serves and supports individuals and communities affected by homelessness, substance use, and untreated mental health issues. Laura’s work includes advocacy for veterans, older adults, and people who are differently abled, to ensure connectedness and wellness. Prior to working in the administration Laura has a background in research management, working in collaboration with corporate and academic partners to negotiate and support clearance of medical devices through the FDA. Laura graduated from Carnegie Mellon and lives in Troy Hill.

About the Office of Community Health & Safety: OCHS redirects city resources to better meet community needs by housing social services, public health and social work experts who can assist first responders in situations that require longer-term assistance, harm reduction support and other services. The office operates under the co-direction of the Department of Public Safety and Office of the Mayor. The goals and directives of the office are to:

  1. Develop community health and safety priorities and areas of focus based on community input and areas of need most frequently encountered by public safety personnel.
  2. Establish a group of community health and safety advisors made up of public health leaders to advise, educate, support and inform on best practices for sustainable social and health support in city programs, policies and legislation.
  3. Conduct regular trainings with all public safety personnel designed in collaboration between staff, experts and communities to ensure first responders are prepared to appropriately engage with complex situations that may require additional harm reduction support.
  4. Collaborate with higher education programs throughout the city to provide training opportunities for social work students to help respond to community needs.

Joshua Schneider BS, NRP

AmeriCorps VISTA, Office of Mayor William Peduto

Bio: Josh Schneider is an Oakland resident and a paramedic in the Pittsburgh region. He currently serves as an AmeriCorps VISTA Fellow in the Mayor's Office of Equity.






Eric Williams

Community Liaison, Office of Community Affairs

Bio: Eric Williams, is currently Community Affairs Liaison for the City of Pittsburgh in Mayor Bill Peduto’s Office. There he provides citywide services, programming, and support to residents and community groups. Williams has always looked for unique opportunities to support people living in rural and urban areas.




Sergeant Tiffany Kline-Costa

Community Engagement Office of the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police

Bio: Tiffany Costa is the Sergeant of the Community Engagement Office, coordinating and supporting police community relationship building throughout the city. She has held this position since the creation of the Community Engagement Office in September of 2019. Costa has been employed by the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police since August of 2012. She has worked in patrol, as a patrol sergeant, and as a Community Resource Officer for Zone 6 in the West End neighborhoods. During her time as CRO in Zone 6, Sgt Costa developed a program called Youth Connections, taking officers into 9th grade Civics classrooms to discuss relationships between police and youth, educated youth about law enforcement careers, and encourage difficult dialogue about police current events. The aim is to demonstrate to officers that youth are humans, while allowing the youth to realize police officers are human beings too. Sgt Costa has also been involved with the Police Inside- Out Program and works with citizens re-entering civilian life surrounding issues of public safety. Sgt Costa also coordinated an initiative Need a Mask, Take a Mask to ensure vulnerable populations within the city had access to personal protective gear as a response to pandemic and health concerns.

Preparation for the April Meeting

For the meeting, please take some time to review the below materials:

A look at the public safety chapter of the Minneapolis comprehensive plan. This two-page section highlights the strategies that Minneapolis has chosen to prioritize in safer public realm design.

TEDx Talks (22:17 minute video). The Commissioner of Health in Baltimore, Dr. Wen, discusses how public health is the lens to address poverty, violence, discrimination, and injustice. Redefining the role of public health to be the 21st century urban solution and critical social justice tool, in Baltimore and around the world. Impactful quote (4:35): “If the currency of inequality is years of life, then the opposite of poverty is health.”

If the above video is a trigger for you, an alternative video is provided below which also discusses public health in urban environments.

TEDx Talks (15 minute video): Gary Gaston (CEO of the Nashville Civic Design Center, discusses epiphany, public health, the built environment, and how youth-centric civic engagement and community-based design practices are making an impact in Nashville, TN.

Additionally, we’ve found a few readings that can help inform our perspectives on these topics, all highlighting BIPOC voices and those from the disability community. If you have time, please explore a few of these, too! Note that many of these are opinion pieces and are not put forward as representing the ideas of the City of Pittsburgh; they are instead provided as references to spark conversation with the Community Action Team.

Activity: Today's Headline

Instructions: Using the below engagement tool, click "Pitch your headline." A pop-up window will appear where you can add your headline in the "Title" box. Then, identify the three major issues to accomplishing the challenge from your headline in the "Submission" box. If you have a photo to share that shows the issue described in your headline, you can add that, too!

Alternative Instructions: If you are experiencing issues using the below activity, you can instead download this document and fill it out on your own computer and then email it to Sophia Robison (sophia.robison@pittsburghpa.gov). Click here to download the Word document version of the Headline Activity.

Notes from Breakout Rooms for Today's Headline

During tonight's meeting, we will break into a few groups for 15 minutes to dive into deeper discussion about the headlines written. Facilitators will take notes below. Participants are also welcome to add additional notes here.
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Activity: Future Headline

Instructions: Using the below engagement tool, click "Pitch your headline." A pop-up window will appear where you can add your headline in the "Title" box. Then, identify three initiatives that could help to achieve the accomplishment from your headline in the "Submission" box. If you have a photo to share that shows the accomplishment described in your headline (ex. a Google image from another City that you like), you can add that, too!

Alternative Instructions: If you are experiencing issues using the below activity, you can instead download this document and fill it out on your own computer and then email it to Sophia Robison (sophia.robison@pittsburghpa.gov). Click here to download the Word document version of the Headline Activity.

Notes from Breakout Rooms for Future Headline

During tonight's meeting, we will break into a few groups for 15 minutes to dive into deeper discussion about the headlines written. Facilitators will take notes below. Participants are also welcome to add additional notes here.
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Step 3: Research (7/2021 - ongoing)