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This chapter is about making getting around easier, safer, and more enjoyable. The content of this chapter strengthens transportation systems by making targeted investments throughout the neighborhood and establishing new programs.

Specifically, you'll find proposals to:

  • Improve and enrich the transit experience;
  • Improve pedestrian and bicycle safety and circulation;
  • Make Oakland fully accessible;
  • Address parking demand; and
  • Support economic development through curbside and freight management.

All of the Oakland Plan was created through an iterative process of input, research, and strategy development. Input from the first 6 months of Steering Committee meetings informed the Summer 2020 online open house, the results of which informed the work of the Steering Committee to create the vision statement and goals and the four Action Teams to create strategies. Research and best practices, including insights from local expert Technical Advisory Groups, were woven into all of this work to present draft strategies to the public online and in-person throughout the Fall of 2021. The final content is the culmination of 2.5 years of work. We hope you see your words and ideas reflected in the content below.

30-Day Public Comment Period

We hope you will read the plan and provide comments that can improve this draft before it's formally adopted. You can comment on every aspect of the plan on this website, join us for Zoom events on March 19 and 23, or give us a call by dialing 3-1-1.

Planning Commission Hearing and Action

After the 30 day public comment period, the City's Planning Commission will hold a hearing on April 19th where it will receive testimony on the plan and take action to adopt the plan and recommend the associated zoning proposals on to City Council and the Mayor to become law.

City Council and Mayoral Action

A second set of hearings and meetings will take plan on the zoning proposals. For both Planning Commission and City Council, all property owners in and adjacent to the areas to be rezoned will receive notices. After all the testimony has been heard, City Council will take action to approve the zoning proposals and send them to the Mayor to sign into law.

What are goals?

Goals are long-term outcomes that organizations and the City of Pittsburgh will work towards by taking action on policies, projects, and programs. Goals are aspirational in nature and express the neighborhood's collective desires and values for various topics in the plan. Compared to the policies in the section below, goals can encompass many different ideas and desires whereas policies focus on one specific topic. The goals below are organized as specified in the City's Neighborhood Plan Guide.

M1. Transit service and stations

  • M1.A Maximize the value of shuttles and transit. Public and institutional transportation services are part of an efficient system that serves both economic development and resident needs.
  • M1.B Oakland as transit hub. Oakland is a hub of the regional transit system, on par with downtown, to ensure equitable access to the jobs and activities that are growing here.
  • M1.C Transit is a mode of choice. Stops and station areas are attractive hubs of activity and buses provide the safest, most comfortable, and enjoyable way to get where you’re going.

M2. Pedestrian access, safety, circulation

  • M2.A Pedestrian priority. Streets are designed as a system to provide safe, accessible, and comfortable pedestrian environments.
  • M2.B Circulation. Accessways through and between buildings and open spaces follow pedestrian desire lines.

M3. Accessibility

  • M3.A Accessibility without bounds. True accessibility results from intentional design on the part of public and private investments in the right-of-way and in buildings.
  • M3.B Accessible network. The rights-of-way are improved to create an accessible network of ways to get to and around Oakland.

M4. Bicycle infrastructure

  • M4.A Bike networks. A network of bike facilities gets people to and around Oakland safely, and conveniently, without gaps or the need to divert out of the way. The bike and transit networks are integrated.
  • M4.B Bicycle-oriented development. Activities and facilities in the ground floors of buildings and public right-of-way support and are supported by cyclists.

M5. Traffic safety

  • M5.A Zero fatalities. No one dies or is seriously injured on city streets.
  • M5.B Unbiased enforcement. Safe, equitable, and just outcome in traffic stop and enforcement interactions.

M6. Parking

  • M6.A Comprehensive parking strategy. On- and off-street parking are continuously managed as a system to meet a variety of changing needs with the minimum space dedicated to parked vehicles.
  • M6.B Transition parking. Development that incorporates significant amounts of parking is carefully designed so that parking structures can be converted to other uses and circulation between buildings can be efficiently reprogrammed for non-auto uses.

M7. Freight operations

  • M7.A Freight systems. Delivery of goods to Oakland and movement of trucks through the area needs to be carefully managed to support employment activities and improve safety to other street users.
  • M7.B Safe delivery. Loading and unloading of trucks happens in designated spaces and times to ensure efficient and safe operations.

What are policies?

Policies set a preferred direction and describe what must be done to achieve the goals in the section above. Where goals can have many elements that relate to a central theme, policies should have one clear focus. They are specific enough that future projects can be assessed to determine if they would advance the values in the plan or run counter to them. Along with the vision statement, and goals, policies are formally adopted by the City's Planning Commission. The policies below are organized as specified in the City's Neighborhood Plan Guide.

M1. Transit service and stations

  • Amenities for riders. Ensure well-used bus stops have appropriate amenities for riders such as shade, seating, lighting, public art, and green features.
  • Access to local transit in five minute walk. All people in Oakland are within a five minute walk of local transit service.
  • Safety and accessibility. All bus stops in Oakland meet PAAC design guidelines for safety and accessibility.
  • Access to rapid transit in 10 minutes. All people in Oakland are within 10 minutes of rapid transit service.
  • Multimodal connectivity. Ensure multimodal connectivity in the mobility network to, from, and around the neighborhood.
  • Resources for TDM. All employers have access to TDM resources, whether offered by the City, locally, or within their company.
  • Fewer trips with only one passenger. Reduce single-occupancy vehicle trips to, from, and around Oakland.

M2. Pedestrian access, safety, circulation

  • Open space uses in the rights-of-way. Repurpose portions of streets to create places for community activities, leisure, and commerce. Successful pilot projects should be translated into permanent open spaces with thoughtful designs that incorporate stormwater management and other functions. Access to adjacent parking should be limited with new development and existing access points slowly migrated to other streets or alleys.
  • Pedestrian and bicycle priority. In all projects, prioritize elements that improve pedestrian and bicycle safety over vehicular mobility.
  • Leading pedestrian intervals. Intersections with high-volumes of pedestrians crossing offer leading pedestrian intervals.
  • Sidewalks are clear. Sidewalks remain clear of vehicles and other obstacles (temporary and/or movable).
  • Pedestrian friendly. Enhance the pedestrian environment and design for pedestrian scale.
  • Reduce curb cuts. Reduce curb cuts to minimize conflicts with users of the sidewalk.
  • Sidewalk experience improved. Ensure a safe, connected, and accessible network for all users of the sidewalk.
  • Ample lighting for bikers and walkers. Ensure ample lighting along high-volume pedestrian and bicycle corridors.
  • Complete streets. Identify priority corridors for Complete Streets enhancements.

M3. Accessibility

  • Identify ADA sidewalk needs. Work with the community to identify high-priority corridors and intersections to bring in compliance with ADA standards.
  • Collaborate with ADA community. Work with ADA community to ensure that designated on-street parking is appropriately sited.

M4. Bicycle infrastructure

  • Bicycle supporting resources. Bike shops, repair stations, and other supportive resources are located throughout Oakland, particularly where on-street bicycle improvements have been prioritized.
  • Bike(+) Plan. Implement the Bike(+) Plan for Oakland.
  • Site Healthy Ride stations and mobility hubs. Work with the community and other partners to appropriately site Healthy Ride stations and other mobility hubs.
  • Bike(+) experience improved. Ensure a safe, connected, and accessible network for all bike(+) users.

M5. Traffic safety

  • Calm traffic. Implement traffic calming measures to reduce the speed of vehicular traffic traveling to, from, and around Oakland.

M6. Parking

  • Reduce parking demand. Reduce parking demand (residential, visitor, and commuter) to achieve 85% occupancy (industry standard) throughout the neighborhood.
  • Off-site parking. Combine pedestrian infrastructure improvements with wayfinding and a marketing campaign to encourage visitors to Oakland to utilize off-site parking lots.
  • Surface parking. Prohibit all new surface parking lots and paving of yards and other landscaped areas to serve as parking. Systematically eliminate illegal paved surface parking in residential areas.

M7. Freight operations

  • Curbside management. Ensure efficient use of the curb for all users on the block including consideration for activities occurring during specific times of day.

What are the projects and programs?

The projects and programs are a shared "To Do" list where the community and government identify the projects they want to undertake over the next 10 years to make the vision a reality. Many of the ideas you see below are the result of ideas from people in Oakland, supported by research and case studies, and now ready for your review and inclusion in the final plan.


Dig into the details

In the lists below, you'll get a title, brief description, and information about how the project or program could be realized including when it should start, by whom, and potential funding sources. For many of the ideas below there is "Learn More" button that takes you to a page full of details, drawings, illustrations, and specific ways to provide comments on that strategy. We highly recommend you dig into the details to see what your fellow Oaklanders came up with.


M-1. Bicycle and pedestrian connection to the riverfront

Build an accessible pedestrian and bicycle connection between South Oakland and the Monongahela River. This could implement the long-desired Rock Alley Path which would connect the Oakcliffe area of South Oakland to the Eliza Furnace Trail.

  • When to start: 5-10 years
  • Project lead(s): DOMI
  • Project partner(s): SPC, PennDOT, Oakcliffe Community Organization, OPDC, OTMA
  • Potential funding source(s): Grants

M-2. Build up OTMA -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Update the Oakland Transportation Management Association’s strategic plan to diversify its funding sources and expand on its work to sustainably and equitably address Oakland’s many transportation needs.

  • When to start: 0-2 years
  • Project lead(s): OTMA
  • Project partner(s): PAAC, DOMI, DCP, institutions, elected officials
  • Potential funding source(s): CITF, GEDF, Neighborhood Allies, and the Forbes Fund

M-3. Central Oakland and Pitt Bicycle Connection -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Create a bicycle connection between Central Oakland and Pitt’s campus from Fifth/Forbes Avenue to O’Hara Street on either Bouquet Street or De Soto Street.

  • When to start: 5-10 years
  • Project lead(s): DOMI, University of Pittsburgh
  • Project partner(s): OPDC, OBID, PAAC, Bike Pittsburgh
  • Potential funding source(s): City Capital Budget, University of Pittsburgh, grants

M-4. Centre Avenue and Craig Street Pedestrian and Transit Safety Improvements -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Install pedestrian and transit safety improvements, green infrastructure, and a mobility hub at the intersection of Centre Avenue and Craig Street.

  • When to start: 3-5 years
  • Project lead(s): DOMI
  • Project partner(s): PAAC
  • Potential funding source(s): City Capital Budget, grants

M-5. Complete the Fifth Avenue bikeway -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Design and build the bicycle connection on Fifth Avenue between Bellefield Avenue and Neville Street to connect the dedicated bike lanes in Oakland with the major bike corridor in Shadyside and Junction Hollow Trail.

  • When to start: 3-5 years
  • Project lead(s): DOMI
  • Project partner(s): OTMA, DCP, OPDC, Bike Pittsburgh, institutions
  • Potential funding source(s): DOMI Capital Budget, County and State mobility grants, partnerships with institutions and developers

M-6. Educate all users about good travel behavior

Develop user friendly materials that will help reinforce safe and appropriate behavior for all users of the public right-of-way. Work with Oakland partners to disseminate information.

  • When to start: 3-5 years
  • Project lead(s): DOMI, institutions, OTMA
  • Project partner(s): OBID, OPDC
  • Potential funding source(s): None needed

M-7. Integrated shuttle and transit mobility study -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Implement planning project with all affected organizations in Oakland to study and consolidate shuttle routes and transit services in order to reduce the number of vehicles traveling into Oakland. Identify opportunities for investments in transit that create public benefit and replace shuttle services, and also opportunities for shuttles to provide public services that transit cannot.

  • When to start: 0-2 years
  • Project lead(s): PAAC
  • Project partner(s): Institutions, PAAC, UPMC, DOMI, SPC
  • Potential funding source(s): PAAC, institutions, UPMC

M-8. McKee place complete street -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Create a bicycle and pedestrian connector with green infrastructure improvements between Bates Street and Fifth Avenue.

  • When to start: 3-5 years
  • Project lead(s): DOMI
  • Project partner(s): PWSA, Urban Forestry, TreePGH, Private Developers, OPDC, and BikePGH
  • Potential funding source(s): City Capital Budget, grants, PWSA, private development

M-9. Reimagine Bates Street -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Redesign Bates Street between 2nd Avenue and the Boulevard of the Allies to allow improved transit access, and better bicycle and pedestrian amenities. This redesign should also be part of hillside stabilization efforts in the area and include native habitat restoration. Between Bates Street and Bouquet Street, focus improvements on expanding street width to allow a left turn from the Boulevard onto Bates Street, and reducing conflicts between auto uses and pedestrians.

  • When to start: 0-2 years
  • Project lead(s): PennDOT, DOMI, DCP, PAAC, OTMA
  • Project partner(s): OPDC, institutions, Bike Pittsburgh, Friends of the Riverfront
  • Potential funding source(s): PennDOT

M-10. Reimagine Boulevard of the Allies -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Multimodal improvements to serve all users between Bates Street and Schenley Park.

  • When to start: 0-2 years
  • Project lead(s): DOMI
  • Project partner(s): PennDOT, PAAC, OTMA, DCP, UPMC, businesses and property owners, neighborhood associations
  • Potential funding source(s): City Capital Budget, grants

M-11. Reimagine Robinson Street -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Redesign Robinson Street between Fifth Avenue and Allequippa Street to reduce and calm traffic, and to install intersection safety improvements, new mid-block pedestrian crossings, and street trees and stormwater management features.

  • When to start: 0-2 years
  • Project lead(s): DOMI
  • Project partner(s): OTMA, DCP, PWSA, PennDOT, The Corner Community Center, OPDC, PAAC
  • Potential funding source(s): City Capital Budget, grants, PWSA

M-12. Safe multimodal connection from Fifth Avenue to the Junction Hollow Trail -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Build a safe and improved pedestrian and bicycle route along Neville and Boundary Streets, connecting North Oakland to the Junction Hollow Trail.

  • When to start: 0-2 years
  • Project lead(s): DOMI
  • Project partner(s): OTMA, DCP, OPDC, Bike Pittsburgh, institutions
  • Potential funding source(s): City Capital Budget, County and State mobility grants, partnerships with institutions and developers

M-13. Transit parking offset

Amend the zoning code to allow a reduction in the number of off-street parking spaces required for new development (excluding parking spaces for persons with disabilities) where transit passes are provided to tenants.

  • When to start: 0-2 years
  • Project lead(s): DCP, PAAC
  • Project partner(s): None specified
  • Potential funding source(s): None needed

What are the projects and programs?

The projects and programs are a shared "To Do" list where the community and government identify the projects they want to undertake over the next 10 years to make the vision a reality. Many of the ideas you see below are the result of ideas from people in Oakland, supported by research and case studies, and now ready for your review and inclusion in the final plan.


Dig into the details

In the lists below, you'll get a title, brief description, and information about how the project or program could be realized including when it should start, by whom, and potential funding sources. For many of the ideas below there is "Learn More" button that takes you to a page full of details, drawings, illustrations, and specific ways to provide comments on that strategy. We highly recommend you dig into the details to see what your fellow Oaklanders came up with.


M-14. Address enforcement biases

Create and maintain anonymized and tabulated data about traffic and parking enforcement. Work with university faculty to analyze the data to identify biases and inequities and establish recommendations to address them.

  • When to start: 3-5 years
  • Project lead(s): Public Safety, DOMI, PPA
  • Project partner(s): OPDC, OBID, institutions
  • Potential funding source(s): None needed

M-15. All weather walkability

Create partnership between the City of Pittsburgh and Oakland-based institutions and non-profits ensure all-weather walkability. This includes snow clearing, particularly in cases where there are absent or challenged owners.

  • When to start: 5-10 years
  • Project lead(s): DOMI, institutions, OPDC, OBID, OTMA
  • Project partner(s): Not specified
  • Potential funding source(s): City Capital Budget, institutions, grants

M-16. Bike route improvements -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Fill critical gaps in Oakland’s bicycle network through the installation of safe, convenient bicycle facilities that would make biking a reasonable transportation option for thousands more people.

  • When to start: Ongoing
  • Project lead(s): DOMI
  • Project partner(s): Institutions, OTMA, OPDC, OBID, BikePGH, Pittsburgh Bikeshare
  • Potential funding source(s): City Capital Budget, institutions, grants

M-17. Build transportation planning capacity

Work with institutions to hire transportation planning professionals, separate from their parking services offices, that are focused on programs to reduce single-occupancy vehicle trips.

  • When to start: 0-2 years
  • Project lead(s): DOMI, DCP, institutions, OTMA
  • Project partner(s): Not specified
  • Potential funding source(s): Institutions

M-18. Transit pass purchasing

Create program that allows employers, developers, and other organizations to make transit pass purchases at a discount.

  • When to start: 3-5 years
  • Project lead(s): PAAC
  • Project partner(s): institutions, major employers, OBID, OTMA
  • Potential funding source(s): Institutions

M-19. Bus stop enhancements -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Improve transit users’ access, comfort and mobility when taking transit by including weather protection, lighting, art, green features, signage, bike parking, and safe multimodal connections, in addition to minimum bus stop features, where appropriate, based on prioritization criteria. Ensure that bus stops are accessible via well-marked crosswalks and well-maintained sidewalks.

  • When to start: Ongoing
  • Project lead(s): PAAC, DOMI
  • Project partner(s): Arts and design committee, OPDC, and neighborhood associations
  • Potential funding source(s): PAAC, OPA, institutions, foundation grants in partnership with OBID and OPDC

M-20. Community-based approach to parking enforcement

Develop a community-based parking enforcement program. Involve employers, affected residents, students, and community leaders in the process to develop the program. Special attention must be paid to reducing parking within bus zones, bike lanes, and on sidewalks. This may include a public awareness campaign.

  • When to start: 5-10 years
  • Project lead(s): DOMI
  • Project partner(s): Institutional police, City Police, and PPA enforcement officers
  • Potential funding source(s): Parking Authority, grants

M-21. Connecting east-west within the city -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Add new east-west transit, bicycle, and pedestrian connections to the Hill District and Strip District to the west, and Squirrel Hill, Greenfield, and Hazelwood to the east.

  • When to start: 3-5 years
  • Project lead(s): PAAC
  • Project partner(s): DOMI, DCP
  • Potential funding source(s): Grants

M-22. Connecting to eastern corridor growth -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Improve frequency and speed of transit service to areas to the east of Pittsburgh all the way to Monroeville. Improved service can ensure that Oakland jobs are connected to these rapidly developing areas and help drive transit-oriented development along the corridor.

  • When to start: 5-10 years
  • Project lead(s): PAAC
  • Project partner(s): Not specified
  • Potential funding source(s): PAAC

M-23. Connecting to regional and national transportation -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Establish frequent and direct transit service between Oakland and the airport and Amtrak trainline. Equip transit vehicles to accommodate users' luggage. This has both convenience, economic development, and sustainability benefits.

  • When to start: 5-10 years
  • Project lead(s): PAAC
  • Project partner(s): Not specified
  • Potential funding source(s): PAAC

M-24. Connecting to the Mon valley communities -- CLICK HERE AND HERE TO LEARN MORE

Expand on the benefits of the Downtown-Oakland-East End Bus Rapid Transit system by upgrading transit service to the Mon valley communities including Braddock, East Pittsburgh, Homestead, and McKeesport. Doing so would greatly improve access to Oakland jobs for those living in these communities.

  • When to start: 5-10 years
  • Project lead(s): PAAC
  • Project partner(s): Not specifiied
  • Potential funding source(s): PAAC

M-25. Connecting to the North and South Hills -- CLICK HERE, and HERE, and HERE TO LEARN MORE

Improve transit service to the North and South Hill areas where many Oakland employees live to reduce auto trips into Oakland. Travel time and frequency are key considerations in meeting the needs of commuters traveling longer distances into and out of Oakland each day.

  • When to start: 5-10 years
  • Project lead(s): PAAC
  • Project partner(s): Institutions
  • Potential funding source(s): PAAC

M-26. Construction coordination

Establish a formal construction coordination program that connects public agencies with community stakeholder organization to maintain a list of projects and anticipated construction schedules with the goal of sharing information, minimizing disruptions, find opportunities to combine efforts, and integrate community needs into projects consistently.

  • When to start: 0-2 years
  • Project lead(s): DOMI, OTMA
  • Project partner(s): Institutions, UPMC, OBID, OPDC, DPW, City Special Events Office, PLI, utilities
  • Potential funding source(s): Institutions, DOMI

M-27. Curbside management toolkit -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Create a curbside management program to systematically improve the mobility, safety, and livability of the community through the proactive planning and use of curb space in commercial areas throughout Oakland.

  • When to start: 0-2 years
  • Project lead(s): DOMI
  • Project partner(s): DCP, Pittsburgh Parking Authority, Magisterial District Court for Allegheny County (Fifth Judicial District of Pennsylvania), institutions
  • Potential funding source(s): None needed

M-28. Eliminate obstructions to improve accessibility

Create program to systematically eliminate conflicts where utility poles create obstructions for pedestrians and wheelchair users. Start the program by conducting a complete survey of all such conflicts. This survey should be used to identify locations each year where conflicts will be removed and as a means to identify opportunities where other projects can eliminate them as part of their work.

  • When to start: 0-2 years
  • Project lead(s): DOMI
  • Project partner(s): Utilities, institutions, OTMA, Oakland for All
  • Potential funding source(s): City Capital Budget

M-29. Enforce sidewalk standards

Develop policy and educate staff at DOMI to improve enforcement of sidewalk conditions for commercial property owners.

  • When to start: Ongoing
  • Project lead(s): DOMI
  • Project partner(s): Not specified
  • Potential funding source(s): None needed

M-30. Improve city steps -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Continue to implement City Steps Plan, but add additional features such as wayfinding, runnels, maintenance, emergency call boxes for all projects.

  • When to start: Ongoing
  • Project lead(s): DOMI
  • Project partner(s): Not specified
  • Potential funding source(s): City Capital Budget, grants

M-31. Manage on-street parking -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Create and pass legislation that updates residential permit parking zones and establishes a parking enhancement district in Oakland.

  • When to start: Ongoing
  • Project lead(s): DOMI (parking study), PPA (conversion of RPP zones to hybrid zones), Mayor’s Office (creation of new PED)
  • Project partner(s): OTMA, OBID, OPDC
  • Potential funding source(s): None needed

M-32. Partnerships for micromobility solutions

Establish working group of affected stakeholders in Oakland, including residents, to be part of decision-making processes for the siting of shared mobility services.

  • When to start: 3-5 years
  • Project lead(s): DOMI
  • Project partner(s): Institutions, OTMA, OBID, OPDC, neighborhood associations
  • Potential funding source(s): None needed

M-33. Pedestrian safety improvements -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Install pedestrian safety improvements throughout Oakland at intersections and corridors that were identified during the planning process as posing safety risks.

  • When to start: Ongoing
  • Project lead(s): DOMI
  • Project partner(s): Institutions, OTMA, OBID, OPDC, PennDOT, SPC, DCP, Oakland for All, neighborhood associations
  • Potential funding source(s): City Capital Budget, County and State mobility grants, partnerships with institutions and developers

M-34. Performance-based parking -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Implement Performance Based Parking in commercial areas of Oakland to help people reliably find parking within walking distance of their destinations, reduce emissions, and lessen traffic congestion from drivers circling in search of parking.

  • When to start: 0-2 years
  • Project lead(s): Pittsburgh Parking Authority
  • Project partner(s): DOMI, OTMA, PAAC, OBID, OPDC, Traffic21, institutions
  • Potential funding source(s): Grants

M-35. Reduce curb cut creation

Brief staff at DOMI on policies in this plan pertaining to limiting and removing curb cuts. Goals include reducing potential conflicts, support increased pedestrian and bicycle access, and supporting community uses in the right-of-way. Encourage curb cut removal during sidewalk (re)construction.

  • When to start: Ongoing
  • Project lead(s): DOMI
  • Project partner(s): Not specified
  • Potential funding source(s): None needed

M-36. Sidewalk connections and accessibility improvements -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Create a program to inventory, prioritize, and install sidewalk and accessibility improvements that address obstructions to pedestrian travel throughout Oakland.

  • When to start: Ongoing
  • Project lead(s): DOMI, DPW
  • Project partner(s): DCP, PennDOT, utilities, PAAC, OPDC, OBID, neighborhood associations
  • Potential funding source(s): City Capital Budget, grants

M-37. Sidewalk improvement program for homeowners -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Create a program that efficiently addresses urgent sidewalk repairs, with a minimum cost burden to homeowners.

  • When to start: 0-2 years
  • Project lead(s): Mayor’s Office, City Council, DOMI, DPW
  • Project partner(s): OPDC, OBID, neighborhood organizations, commercial property owners
  • Potential funding source(s): See summary

M-38. Support frontline and shift workers

Establish ongoing initiative with institutions to get a complete picture of where frontline and shift workers live to better understand their transit needs.

  • When to start: 3-5 years
  • Project lead(s): PAAC, UPMC, institutions
  • Project partner(s): Not specified
  • Potential funding source(s): Institutions, PAAC, grants

M-39. Traffic calming corridors -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Install traffic calming treatments on high-speed streets throughout Oakland at intersections and corridors that pose safety risks.

  • When to start: Ongoing
  • Project lead(s): DOMI
  • Project partner(s): PennDOT, OTMA, OPDC, OBID, neighborhood associations
  • Potential funding source(s): City Capital Budget, grants

M-40. Transportation demand management program -- CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Develop comprehensive strategy that brings together all relevant agencies, institutions, and non-profit partners to reduce single-occupancy vehicle trips and congestion in Oakland. This should include incentives programs at institutions and major employers, updated City policies and regulations for development, a program to more efficiently utilize existing parking facilities, and informational campaigns for those coming into Oakland as well as new and existing residents.

  • When to start: 0-2 years
  • Project lead(s): DOMI
  • Project partner(s): OTMA, PAAC, DCP, institutions, OBID, OPDC
  • Potential funding source(s): Grants

M-41. Walking is healthy informational campaign

Develop campaign with UPMC that highlights walking as part of an active, healthy lifestyle (e.g. Healthy Oakland branding, sitting is the new smoking). Could involve larger group of stakeholders and include walking incentives (e.g., CityFit program and other insurance benefits provided through employers).

  • When to start: 3-5 years
  • Project lead(s): DOMI, UPMC
  • Project partner(s): OTMA
  • Potential funding source(s): UPMC

Mobility Chapter - What do you think? (Open Ended)

Please let us know what you think of the goals, policies, projects, and programs above. If you have comments on a project or program that has a separate page, please go to that page to share your feedback.
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